5 FAQs About the New 9/11 Lawsuits

1. What is JASTA?

 The Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act, or JASTA, allows victims of terrorist acts committed on American soil to file lawsuits against foreign governments who helped carry out the attacks. It creates an exemption to the foreign sovereign immunity that typically protects countries in these kinds of incidents.

Senator John Cornyn (R – TX) introduced the bill in September 2015. A year later, President Obama vetoed the bill, citing national security and diplomatic concerns. But days later, he was overridden by Congress via a 97-to-1 vote in the Senate and a 348-to-77 vote in the House.

JASTA was enacted on September 28, 2016. People who suffered physical, financial, or property damage as a result of the 9/11 attacks can now seek relief from foreign governments that they feel played a role in the attacks.

Stephanie DeSimone—the wife of Navy Commander Patrick Dunn, who died at the Pentagon on September 11—filed a 9/11 lawsuit against Saudi Arabia shortly after JASTA’s passing.

2. Why did Obama try to veto JASTA?

The main reason Obama vetoed JASTA (only to be overridden by Congress) is because the law could open up the U.S. to litigation over its military actions abroad (drone strikes, civilian casualties, etc.). Even if the U.S. was not convicted of wrongdoing, Obama argued, the evidence it would have to supply in the discovery phase of trial could jeopardize national security.

In his statement to Congress, President Obama said, “Enacting [this legislation] into law… would neither protect Americans from terrorist attacks nor improve the effectiveness of our response to such attacks.”

Of course, the point of the law is not protection or retaliation but relief for victims of 9/11 and accountability for its perpetrators.

Hold Them Accountable

3. Did the Saudi government play a role in 9/11?

Maybe. Fifteen of the 19 hijackers on 9/11 were Saudi citizens (the other four were from the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, and Lebanon).

Though the 9/11 Commission Report “found no evidence that the Saudi government as an institution or senior Saudi officials individually funded the organization,” it also noted, “Saudi Arabia has long been considered the primary source of al Qaeda funding.” Al Qaeda’s Osama bin Laden, of course, claimed responsibility for orchestrating the 9/11 attacks.

Also of note: Saudi Arabia spent more than $3 million dollars to lobby against JASTA, which also raised some eyebrows. If they don’t bear any responsibility for the 9/11 attacks, why did they try so hard to kill the bill?

As Senator Charles Schumer (D – NY) put it, “If the Saudis did nothing wrong, they should not fear this legislation.”

4. Who qualifies for a 9/11 lawsuit?

Anyone who suffered physical, financial, or property damage from the 9/11 attacks is now eligible to seek redress from foreign governments like Saudi Arabia’s, assuming they can prove liability on the part of that government.

Importantly, eligible parties may have filed domestic 9/11-related lawsuits in the past. For example, a potential client may have been denied redress in an earlier case because he was working at the time of his or her injury and awarded worker’s compensation. Whether a past lawsuit was successful has no bearing on the new 9/11 lawsuits that will be filed against foreign governments.

Qualifying parties may include:

  • Business owners in Lower Manhattan/the Financial District
  • First responders (police, firefighters, etc.) on 9/11
  • Spouses and family members of 9/11 casualties
  • People working in the Pentagon or at Ground Zero on 9/11
  • Cleanup workers at the attack sites

5. What types of relief do people seek in a 9/11 lawsuit?

Depending on the circumstances of the case, plaintiffs may seek relief in a 9/11 lawsuit for the following:

  • Property damage
  • Loss of business/wages
  • Medical bills
  • Pain and suffering
  • Funeral expenses
  • Punitive damages
  • Attorney fees

Our attorneys have extensive experience with complex litigation. As one of the largest consumer protection firms in the country—with 300+ attorneys and a support staff of more than 1,500—we are one of the few with the resources to take on a foreign government like Saudi Arabia. To date, we have won $2 billion for 200,000 clients.

If you or a loved one suffered losses as a result of these horrific attacks, the Saudi government may be partially to blame, and you could be owed compensation. For a free, no-obligation case review, contact us today or call 888-522-5237.

What You Need to Know About the 9/11 Lawsuit Bill

Congress has almost unanimously voted to pass the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA), overriding a veto from President Obama. The bill, first introduced by Senator John Cornyn in September 2015, makes it easier for victims of terrorism to file lawsuits against foreign governments.

The Senate voted 97-to-1 in favor of the bill—a rare bipartisan victory. (Only Harry Reid of Nevada voted against.) The House voted 348-to-77 in favor. This marks the first override of a veto during Obama’s presidency.

Prior to the House vote, Representative Ted Poe (R—TX) said, “We as a people should be more concerned about these victims of terror than we are about democratic niceties… Justice has been waiting too long.”

JASTA Allows Families of 9/11 Victims to Sue Saudis

Capitol_hillHistorically, international law has largely protected governments from being sued under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act. However, the JASTA bill creates an exception and allows civil claims to be filed against foreign governments for acts of violence and terrorism that occur on U.S. soil.

Specifically, the bill states that the plotting and planning of acts of violence do not have to happen on U.S. soil. It also holds foreign governments accountable for aiding and abetting acts of violence, whether or not they performed the acts themselves.

These clarifications make it easier for 9/11 victims (including families of the deceased and businesses that sustained economic losses) to file lawsuits against the Saudi government for their alleged involvement in the terrorist attacks.

Though an independent commission did not find evidence that the government or a senior official officially supported the 9/11 terrorist attacks, recently declassified information indirectly connects Saudi Ambassador Prince Bandar bin Sultan to al Qaeda.

“We want accountability.”

Families of 9/11 victims say they want answers concerning the horrible acts that claimed the lives of their loved ones. “We want accountability,” said Terry Strada, whose husband died in the World Trade Center. “I think the truth would be the first thing, our mission.”

Opponents Fear Foreign Backlash

Justice and answers are not enough though to sway opponents of the new legislation, who argue that it could damage foreign relations.

Opponents fear that the bill will result in foreign governments pulling their assets out of the United States. Saudi Arabia allegedly threatened to liquidate $750 billion in U.S. assets should the bill pass, though some believe this to be an empty threat.

The Obama administration also argues that the act could set legal precedent and result in future lawsuits against the U.S. government and military personnel. They point to the U.S. military’s actions in the Middle East as easy targets for potential lawsuits.

However, supporters argue that because of the bill’s narrow scope, it is unlikely to trigger a significant uptick in litigation. JASTA only implicates countries who support terrorism—acts for which foreign governments should be held accountable.

Senator Chuck Schumer told The New York Times, “If the Saudis did nothing wrong, they should not fear this legislation.”

Saudi Arabia Enlisted Help from Lobbyists, Corporations

Saudi Arabia hired two lobbying firms and spent more than $3 million to try to kill the legislation.

Though Saudi Arabia continues to claim they are innocent of any involvement in the 9/11 attacks, they hired two lobbying firms and spent more than $3 million to try to kill the legislation.

The kingdom also used the Saudi Arabian assets of some Fortune 100 companies to their advantage. Companies like General Electric, Chevron, Boeing, and Dow Chemical all quietly opposed the bill, fearing the security of their assets abroad.

ClassAction.com Attorneys Are Investigating

ClassAction.com attorneys are keeping a close eye on the new 9/11 lawsuit legislation. We currently have former FBI investigators looking into possible connections to Saudi Arabia in the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and will keep you up to date on our findings.